Decluttering My Goodreads TBR #7

Part 7 of my process of trying to delete some books off of my Goodreads TBR continues!

Click on the covers to read the synopsis each of book.


The Vacationers by Emma Straub
the vacationers

This seems like it’ll be a great summer read and I already own it! I know its about rich people and their first world, upper-class problems (which honestly isn’t a favorite subject of mine). The cover is simply stylish though.

VERDICT: KEEP

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

eleanor & park cover

I DNF’d this one years ago when I first bought it and read some of it. I haven’t touched it in a long while and I honestly don’t plan on picking it back up again. This book has gotten criticism over its harmful depiction of racial stereotypes and racism towards one of its MCs, Park who is half-Korean and half-Irish-American.

VERDICT: DELETE

Stolen: A Letter to My Captor by Lucy Christopher
stolen book cover

This book seems interesting but I have so many other books I’d rather read before I ever get to this one. So I’m deleting it for now.

VERDICT: DELETE

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
the perks of being a wallflower

Sad fact: I’ve already seen the movie. I liked the movie a lot and I’m not really sure whether it would benefit me to read this book. I know there’s a chance that there were differences but I mean….the movie has Ezra Miller in it, so that’s a plus towards the movie. Maybe if I find this out a thrift store or Goodwill for a cheap price, I may read it but for now it’s a delete.

VERDICT: DELETE

Rules by Cynthia Lord
rules cynthia lord

I vaguely remember reading this in middle school and I liked that it was about a girl whose brother has autism. But I also never finished and since then I have never seen it anywhere. Knowing that this a middle grade read, I’ll probably never read it again, but maybe one day I’ll just find it and decide if I want to add it to be my TBR again.

VERDICT: DELETE

Flipped by Wendelin van Draanen
flipped

So this book I’ve read once before, but I guess I placed it back on because I wanted to re-read it at that time. But now, I barely remember the plot and characters and quite frankly I don’t care lol.

VERDICT: DELETE

Just Listen by Sarah Dessen
just listen sarah dessen

Ahh Sarah Dessen, one of the earliest YA contemporary romance authors I remember getting into. I barely read this one and then put it down and eventually sold my copy of it. Over time I’ve realized YA romance is something I have a love it or hate it relationship with.

VERDICT: DELETE

Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson
wintergirls

I’ve always remembered enjoying Speak, also by Laurie Halse Anderson, which was about rape. However I don’t remember how well it was handled. So this book, which is about eating disorders, is one that I’m very hesistant to read about considering it’s not going to be an #OWNVoices read.

VERDICT: DELETE

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
all the bright places

All the Bright Places has its critics and its fans. There are people who love the romance and characters, but also those who hate the way that mental illness is represented in this and also the fact that it apparently uses the “love cures all” cliche. I’m just not in ~in the mood~ for reading a poorly handled mental illness book :/

VERDICT: DELETE

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
ill give you the sun

I still have zero idea what this about after the reading the synopsis because it’s pretty vague but this has a lot of great reviews and it’s pretty hyped.

VERDICT: KEEP

Decluttering My Goodreads #6

Hey everyone! I know its been a whole week or so since I last posted due to me busy AF last week. However I’m back and ready to post some more Decluttering Posts because I seriously need to continue with it.


In the Woods (Dublin Murder Squad #1) by Tana French

A gorgeously written novel that marks the debut of an astonishing new voice in psychological suspense.

As dusk approaches a small Dublin suburb in the summer of 1984, mothers begin to call their children home. But on this warm evening, three children do not return from the dark and silent woods. When the police arrive, they find only one of the children. He is gripping a tree trunk in terror, wearing blood-filled sneakers and unable to recall a single detail of the previous hours.

Twenty years later, the found boy, Rob Ryan, is a detective on the Dublin Murder Squad and keeps his past a secret. But when a 12-year-old girl is found murdered in the same woods, he and Detective Cassie Maddox (his partner and closest friend) find themselves investigating a case chillingly similar to the previous unsolved mystery. Now, with only snippets of long-buried memories to guide him, Ryan has the chance to uncover both the mystery of the case before him and that of his own shadowy past.

This sounds pretty good but I’m not interested in murder mysteries right now.

VERDICT: DELETE 

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from New York Times bestselling author, National Book Award finalist, and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart. 

Read it.

And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.

Okay the ending of the synopsis that’s telling me to read makes me want to read it less. But the rest of the synopsis is SO VAGUE. I honestly don’t love vague AF synopses for books. Especially for this book because its sounds like a gazillion other novels. Also I haven’t really heard the best things about this.

VERDICT: DELETE

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones is the story of a family devastated by a gruesome murder — a murder recounted by the teenage victim. Upsetting, you say? Remarkably, first-time novelist Alice Sebold takes this difficult material and delivers a compelling and accomplished exploration of a fractured family’s need for peace and closure.

The details of the crime are laid out in the first few pages: from her vantage point in heaven, Susie Salmon describes how she was confronted by the murderer one December afternoon on her way home from school. Lured into an underground hiding place, she was raped and killed. But what the reader knows, her family does not. Anxiously, we keep vigil with Susie, aching for her grieving family, desperate for the killer to be found and punished.

Sebold creates a heaven that’s calm and comforting, a place whose residents can have whatever they enjoyed when they were alive — and then some. But Susie isn’t ready to release her hold on life just yet, and she intensely watches her family and friends as they struggle to cope with a reality in which she is no longer a part. To her great credit, Sebold has shaped one of the most loving and sympathetic fathers in contemporary literature.

I remember actually reading this many many years ago and just kind of being bored with it? IDK but I think a lot of people have changed their minds on this book and not in a good way. I saw the movie too just thought it was okay. So I’m fine with deleting it off my TBR.

VERDICT: DELETE

 

The 5th Wave (The 5th Wave) by Rick Yancey

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother-or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.  

I had actually owned this book for several years until I finally decided to let it go just because I was never going to be interested in it. Also after watching several videos where many people said that the series got progressively worse made me want to stay away from it.

VERDICT: DELETE

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein

NAME: Valentine Michael Smith
ANCESTRY: Human
ORIGIN: Mars

Valentine Michael Smith is a human being raised on Mars, newly returned to Earth. Among his people for the first time, he struggles to understand the social mores and prejudices of human nature that are so alien to him, while teaching them his own fundamental beliefs in grokking, watersharing, and love.

This is a classic science fiction novel and I can’t wait to read it. Something about the title really appeals to me. Also this particular cover is absolutely gorgeous IMO.

stranger in a strange land

VERDICT: KEEP

The Girl With All the Gifts (#1) By M.R. Carey

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr. Caldwell calls her “our little genius.”

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant Parks keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don’t like her. She jokes that she won’t bite, but they don’t laugh.

Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children’s cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she’ll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn’t know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

The Girl with All the Gifts is a sensational thriller, perfect for fans of Stephen King, Justin Cronin, and Neil Gaiman.

I’ve heard some mixed things about this but haven’t gotten around to actually reading it for myself. I own it so might as well try to read it at some point.

VERDICT: KEEP

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

From the acclaimed author of The Remains of the Day and When We Were Orphans, a moving new novel that subtly reimagines our world and time in a haunting story of friendship and love.

As a child, Kathy – now thirty-one years old – lived at Hailsham, a private school in the scenic English countryside where the children were sheltered from the outside world, brought up to believe that they were special and that their well-being was crucial not only for themselves but for the society they would eventually enter. Kathy had long ago put this idyllic past behind her, but when two of her Hailsham friends come back into her life, she stops resisting the pull of memory.

And so, as her friendship with Ruth is rekindled, and as the feelings that long ago fueled her adolescent crush on Tommy begin to deepen into love, Kathy recalls their years at Hailsham. She describes happy scenes of boys and girls growing up together, unperturbed–even comforted–by their isolation. But she describes other scenes as well: of discord and misunderstanding that hint at a dark secret behind Hailsham’s nurturing facade. With the dawning clarity of hindsight, the three friends are compelled to face the truth about their childhood–and about their lives now.

A tale of deceptive simplicity, Never Let Me Go slowly reveals an extraordinary emotional depth and resonance–and takes its place among Kazuo Ishiguro’s finest work.

This has probably been on my TBR for the LONGEST time. I still own this and I have read some chapters into it and I pretty much enjoyed what I had read then. I really need to pick this back up.

VERDICT: KEEP

Annihilation (Southern Reach Trilogy #1) by Jeff VanderMeer

Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer.

This is the twelfth expedition.

Their group is made up of four women: an anthropologist; a surveyor; a psychologist, the de facto leader; and our narrator, a biologist. Their mission is to map the terrain and collect specimens; to record all their observations, scientific and otherwise, of their surroundings and of one another; and, above all, to avoid being contaminated by Area X itself.

They arrive expecting the unexpected, and Area X delivers—they discover a massive topographic anomaly and life forms that surpass understanding—but it’s the surprises that came across the border with them, and the secrets the expedition members are keeping from one another, that change everything. 

Definitely plan on keeping this one. Hopefully I can be patient and not just go ahead and decide to watch the movie first.

VERDICT: KEEP

Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure by Sarah Macdonald

In her twenties, journalist Sarah Macdonald backpacked around India and came away with a lasting impression of heat, pollution and poverty. So when an airport beggar read her palm and told her she would return to India—and for love—she screamed, “Never!” and gave the country, and him, the finger.

But eleven years later, the prophecy comes true. When the love of Sarah’s life is posted to India, she quits her dream job to move to the most polluted city on earth, New Delhi. For Sarah this seems like the ultimate sacrifice for love, and it almost kills her, literally. Just settled, she falls dangerously ill with double pneumonia, an experience that compels her to face some serious questions about her own fragile mortality and inner spiritual void. “I must find peace in the only place possible in India,” she concludes. “Within.” Thus begins her journey of discovery through India in search of the meaning of life and death.

Holy Cow is Macdonald’s often hilarious chronicle of her adventures in a land of chaos and contradiction, of encounters with Hinduism, Islam and Jainism, Sufis, Sikhs, Parsis and Christians and a kaleidoscope of yogis, swamis and Bollywood stars. From spiritual retreats and crumbling nirvanas to war zones and New Delhi nightclubs, it is a journey that only a woman on a mission to save her soul, her love life—and her sanity—can survive.

I own this one as well and it just interested me for some reason but I have yet to read it. I should change that.

VERDICT: KEEP


KEEP: 5
DELETE: 4

Thanks for reading!

Sav

Decluttering My Goodreads #5

PARTS 123,

I usually only list about 10 for each post but I put a lot more on here this time because I just wanted to finish the part of my Goodreads Want to Read list where its books about music, musicians, or related to music. I also changed some of the rules for myself. If there’s a book that I don’t see myself buying or picking up in the near future (even if I’m interested in it), I’m going to go ahead and delete off of my TBR.


1) Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground, 1981-1991 by Michael Azerrad

This is the never-before-told story of the musical revolution that happened right under the nose of the Reagan Eighties–when a small but sprawling network of bands, labels, fanzines, radio stations, and other subversives reenergized American rock with punk rock’s do-it-yourself credo and created music that was deeply personal, often brilliant, always challenging, and immensely influential. This sweeping chronicle of music, politics, drugs, fear, loathing, and faith has been recognized as an indie rock classic in its own right. Among the bands profiled: Mission of Burma, Butthole Surfers, The Minutemen, Sonic Youth, Black Flag, Big Black, Hüsker Dü, Fugazi, Minor Threat, Mudhoney, The Replacements, Beat Happening, and Dinosaur Jr.

So I’m still interested in reading this but there’s so many other books I want to get around to before this one. *shrugs*
VERDICT: DELETE  

2) The Haters by Jesse Andrews

Inspired by the years he spent playing bass in a band himself, The Haters is Jesse Andrews’s road trip adventure about a trio of jazz-camp escapees who, against every realistic expectation, become a band.

For Wes and his best friend, Corey, jazz camp turns out to be lame. It’s pretty much all dudes talking in Jazz Voice. But then they jam with Ash, a charismatic girl with an unusual sound, and the three just click. It’s three and a half hours of pure musical magic, and Ash makes a decision: They need to hit the road. Because the road, not summer camp, is where bands get good. Before Wes and Corey know it, they’re in Ash’s SUV heading south, and The Haters Summer of Hate Tour has begun.

In his second novel, Andrews again brings his brilliant and distinctive voice to YA, in the perfect book for music lovers, fans of The Commitments and High Fidelity, or anyone who has ever loved—and hated—a song or a band. This witty, funny coming-of-age novel is contemporary fiction at its best.

Meh…
VERDICT: DELETE 

3) Rip it Up and Start Again by Simon Reynolds

Punk’s raw power rejuvenated rock, but by the summer of 1977 the movement had become a parody of itself. RIP IT UP AND START AGAIN is a celebration of what happened next.

Post-punk bands like PiL, Joy Division, Talking Heads, The Fall and The Human League dedicated themselves to fulfilling punk’s unfinished musical revolution. The post-punk groups were fervent modernists; whether experimenting with electronics and machine rhythm or adapting ideas from dub reggae and disco, they were totally confident they could invent a whole new future for music.  

Same thoughts with this concerning the #1 item.

VERDICT: DELETE  

4) If I Stay by Gayle Forman

Choices. Seventeen-year-old Mia is faced with some tough ones: Stay true to her first love—music—even if it means losing her boyfriend and leaving her family and friends behind?

Then one February morning Mia goes for a drive with her family, and in an instant, everything changes. Suddenly, all the choices are gone, except one. And it’s the only one that matters.

If I Stay is a heartachingly beautiful book about the power of love, the true meaning of family, and the choices we all make.

I saw the movie and I really really didn’t like it, so I highly doubt I’d like the book. :/
VERDICT: DELETE 

5) A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

Jennifer Egan’s spellbinding interlocking narratives circle the lives of Bennie Salazar, an aging former punk rocker and record executive, and Sasha, the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Although Bennie and Sasha never discover each other’s pasts, the reader does, in intimate detail, along with the secret lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs, over many years, in locales as varied as New York, San Francisco, Naples, and Africa.

We first meet Sasha in her mid-thirties, on her therapist’s couch in New York City, confronting her long-standing compulsion to steal. Later, we learn the genesis of her turmoil when we see her as the child of a violent marriage, then as a runaway living in Naples, then as a college student trying to avert the suicidal impulses of her best friend. We plunge into the hidden yearnings and disappointments of her uncle, an art historian stuck in a dead marriage, who travels to Naples to extract Sasha from the city’s demimonde and experiences an epiphany of his own while staring at a sculpture of Orpheus and Eurydice in the Museo Nazionale. We meet Bennie Salazar at the melancholy nadir of his adult life—divorced, struggling to connect with his nine-year-old son, listening to a washed-up band in the basement of a suburban house—and then revisit him in 1979, at the height of his youth, shy and tender, reveling in San Francisco’s punk scene as he discovers his ardor for rock and roll and his gift for spotting talent. We learn what became of his high school gang—who thrived and who faltered—and we encounter Lou Kline, Bennie’s catastrophically careless mentor, along with the lovers and children left behind in the wake of Lou’s far-flung sexual conquests and meteoric rise and fall. 

Sounds pretty good.
VERDICT: KEEP 

6) Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon

Kim Gordon, founding member of Sonic Youth, fashion icon, and role model for a generation of women, now tells her story—a memoir of life as an artist, of music, marriage, motherhood, independence, and as one of the first women of rock and roll, written with the lyricism and haunting beauty of Patti Smith’s Just Kids.

Often described as aloof, Kim Gordon opens up as never before in Girl in a Band. Telling the story of her family, growing up in California in the ’60s and ’70s, her life in visual art, her move to New York City, the men in her life, her marriage, her relationship with her daughter, her music, and her band, Girl in a Band is a rich and beautifully written memoir.

Gordon takes us back to the lost New York of the 1980s and ’90s that gave rise to Sonic Youth, and the Alternative revolution in popular music. The band helped build a vocabulary of music—paving the way for Nirvana, Hole, Smashing Pumpkins and many other acts. But at its core, Girl in a Band examines the route from girl to woman in uncharted territory, music, art career, what partnership means—and what happens when that identity dissolves.

Evocative and edgy, filled with the sights and sounds of a changing world and a transformative life, Girl in a Band is the fascinating chronicle of a remarkable journey and an extraordinary artist

VERDICT: DELETE 

7) Songbook by Nick Hornby

Songs, songwriters, and why and how they get under our skin… Songbook is Nick Hornby’s labor of love. A shrewd, funny, and completely unique collection of musings on pop music, why it’s good, what makes us listen and love it, and the ways in which it attaches itself to our lives—all with the beat of a perfectly mastered mix tape.

So I thought this would be a delete when I finally read the synopsis but after reading it again, I’m still interested.
VERDICT: DELETE 

8) Kill the Boy Band by Goldy Moldavsky

Just know from the start that it wasn’t supposed to go like this. All we wanted was to get near them. That’s why we got a room in the hotel where they were staying.

We were not planning to kidnap one of them. Especially not the most useless one. But we had him—his room key, his cell phone, and his secrets.

We were not planning on what happened next.

We swear.

From thrilling new talent Goldy Moldavsky comes a pitch-black, hilarious take on fandom and the badass girls who have the power to make—or break—the people we call “celebrities.”

VERDICT: DELETE 

9) Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan

This he said/she said romance told by YA stars Rachel Cohn and David Levithan is a sexy, funny roller coaster of a story about one date over one very long night, with two teenagers, both recovering from broken hearts, who are just trying to figure out who they want to be—and where the next great band is playing.

Told in alternating chapters, teeming with music references, humor, angst, and endearing side characters, this is a love story you’ll wish were your very own. Working together for the first time, Rachel Cohn and David Levithan have combined forces to create a book that is sure to grab readers of all ages and never let them go.

Yet another one where I’ve seen the movie first, which I thought was pretty good but that years ago and I only watched it that one time. I just really don’t have a huge urge to read this one.
VERDICT: KEEP 

10) Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein

From a leader of feminist punk music at the dawn of the riot-grrrl era, a candid and deeply personal look at life in rock and roll. 

Before Carrie Brownstein codeveloped and starred in the wildly popular TV comedy Portlandia, she was already an icon to young women for her role as a musician in the feminist punk band Sleater-Kinney. The band was a key part of the early riot- grrrl and indie rock scenes in the Pacific Northwest, known for their prodigious guitar shredding and their leftist lyrics against war, traditionalism, and gender roles.

This is a definite keep because I own this and 100% WANT TO READ. Sleater-Kinney is one of my favorite bands of all time and I love Carrie Brownstein.
VERDICT: KEEP 

11) Journals by Kurt Cobain

The lyrics notebook and personal journals of Kurt Cobain, iconic singer of the band Nirvana.

Kurt Cobain filled dozens of notebooks with lyrics, drawings, and writings about his plans for Nirvana and his thoughts about fame, the state of music, and the people who bought and sold him and his music. His journals reveal an artist who loved music, who knew the history of rock, and who was determined to define his place in that history. Here is a mesmerizing, incomparable portrait of the most influential musician of his time.

So while this does seem super interesting I have no idea at any point I’ll ever get around to reading this.
VERDICT: DELETE 

12) This Song Will Save Your Life by Leila Sales

Making friends has never been Elise Dembowski’s strong suit. All throughout her life, she’s been the butt of every joke and the outsider in every conversation. When a final attempt at popularity fails, Elise nearly gives up. Then she stumbles upon a warehouse party where she meets Vicky, a girl in a band who accepts her; Char, a cute, yet mysterious disc jockey; Pippa, a carefree spirit from England; and most importantly, a love for DJing.

Told in a refreshingly genuine and laugh-out-loud funny voice, This Song Will Save Your Life is an exuberant novel about identity, friendship, and the power of music to bring people together.

I’ve heard a lot of really great things about this one and I have almost bought it a few times.
VERDICT: KEEP 

13) Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution by Sara Marcus

Girls to the Front is the epic, definitive history of Riot Grrrl—the radical feminist uprising that exploded into the public eye in the 1990s and included incendiary punk bands Bikini Kill, Bratmobile, Heavens to Betsy, and Huggy Bear. A dynamic chronicle not just a movement but an era, this is the story of a group of pissed-off girls with no patience for sexism and no intention of keeping quiet.

Another one I’m really interested in but I have no clue when I’ll actually ever get to read it. :/

VERDICT: DELETE


TOTAL: OUT OF 13
KEEP: 3
DELETE: 10 

 

Thanks for reading and leave a comment down below!!! 

Sav 

Decluttering My Goodreads TBR #4

PARTS 1, 2, 3


1) In Real Life by Cory Doctorow

Anda loves Coarsegold Online, the massively-multiplayer role-playing game where she spends most of her free time. It’s a place where she can be a leader, a fighter, a hero. It’s a place where she can meet people from all over the world, and make friends. 

But things become a lot more complicated when Anda befriends a gold farmer–a poor Chinese kid whose avatar in the game illegally collects valuable objects and then sells them to players from developed countries with money to burn. This behavior is strictly against the rules in Coarsegold, but Anda soon comes to realize that questions of right and wrong are a lot less straightforward when a real person’s real livelihood is at stake. 

From acclaimed teen author (Little Brother, For the Win) and Boing Boing editor Cory Doctorow and Koko Be Good creator Jen Wang, In Real Life is a perceptive and high-stakes look at adolescence, gaming, poverty, and culture clash.

The synopsis sounds pretty good, so I think I’ll keep this one for now.

VERDICT: KEEP 

2) The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery …

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist – books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

Yeah this book is pretty iconic and I do own it but have yet to read it which I should remedy that at some point.

VERDICT: KEEP

3) All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the stunningly beautiful instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

Marie-Laure lives in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where her father works. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, Werner Pfennig, an orphan, grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find that brings them news and stories from places they have never seen or imagined. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments and is enlisted to use his talent to track down the resistance. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

I also own this one and this has some high honors to it. I also plan on reading at some point this year.

VERDICT: KEEP 

4) Code Name Verity (#1) & Rose Under Fire (#2) by Elizabeth Wein 

So I own both of these books but I honestly don’t have any sort of enthusiasm for reading either of these. I actually plan on selling these unless I somehow find something someone says about these books that I’ll like,.

VERDICT: DELETE

5) This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession

Whether you load your iPod with Bach or Bono, music has a significant role in your life—even if you never realized it. Why does music evoke such powerful moods? The answers are at last be- coming clear, thanks to revolutionary neuroscience and the emerging field of evolutionary psychology. Both a cutting-edge study and a tribute to the beauty of music itself, This Is Your Brain on Music unravels a host of mysteries that affect everything from pop culture to our understanding of human nature, including:
• Are our musical preferences shaped in utero?
• Is there a cutoff point for acquiring new tastes in music?
• What do PET scans and MRIs reveal about the brain’s response to music?
• Is musical pleasure different from other kinds of pleasure?

This Is Your Brain on Music explores cultures in which singing is considered an essential human function, patients who have a rare disorder that prevents them from making sense of music, and scientists studying why two people may not have the same definition of pitch. At every turn, this provocative work unlocks deep secrets about how nature and nurture forge a uniquely human obsession.

This sounds like the sort of science-y & music-y stuff I kind of like! Also this is the start of where my TBR has a WHOLE lotta music-related books.

VERDICT: KEEP 

6) Just Kids by Patti Smith

In Just Kids, Patti Smith’s first book of prose, the legendary American artist offers a never-before-seen glimpse of her remarkable relationship with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in the epochal days of New York City and the Chelsea Hotel in the late sixties and seventies. An honest and moving story of youth and friendship, Smith brings the same unique, lyrical quality to Just Kids as she has to the rest of her formidable body of work–from her influential 1975 album Horses to her visual art and poetry. 

So I’m kind of a big fan of Patti Smith and her music, especially the legendary punk album she created, Horses. 

VERDICT: KEEP 

7) The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century by Alex Ross

The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

Yes, another music related book. Most of these music related books I’m interested in so I’m going to automically keep them unless there’s some sort of exception.

VERDICT: KEEP 

8) Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil

A Time Out and Daily News Top Ten Book of the Year upon its initial release, Please Kill Me is the first oral history of the most nihilist of all pop movements. Iggy Pop, Danny Fields, Dee Dee and Joey Ramone, Malcom McLaren, Jim Carroll, and scores of other famous and infamous punk figures lend their voices to this definitive account of that outrageous, explosive era. From its origins in the twilight years of Andy Warhol’s New York reign to its last gasps as eighties corporate rock, the phenomenon known as punk is scrutinized, eulogized, and idealized by the people who were there and who made it happen.

Yes. Why I would LOVE to read a book about the history of punk rock by a dude named Legs McNeil. SIGN ME UP.

VERDICT: KEEP 

9) Love Is a Mix Tape by Rob Sheffield

In this stunning memoir, Rob Sheffield, a veteran rock and pop culture critic and staff writer for Rolling Stone magazine, tells the story of his musical coming of age, and how rock music, the first love of his life, led him to his second, a girl named Renee. Rob and Renee’s life together – they wed after graduate school, both became music journalists, and were married only five years when Renee died suddenly on Mother’s Day, 1997 – is shared through the window of the mix tapes they obsessively compiled. There are mixes to court each other, mixes for road trips, mixes for doing the dishes, mixes for sleeping – and, eventually, mixes to mourn Rob’s greatest loss. The tunes were among the great musical output of the early 1990s – Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Pavement, Yo La Tengo, REM, Weezer – as well as classics by The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Aretha Franklin and more. Mixing the skilful, tragic punch of Dave Eggers and the romantic honesty of Nick Hornby, LOVE IS A MIX TAPE is a story of lost love and the kick-you-in-the-gut energy of great pop music.

VERDICT: KEEP 

10) How Music Works by David Byrne

How Music Works is David Byrne’s remarkable and buoyant celebration of a subject he has spent a lifetime thinking about. In it he explores how profoundly music is shaped by its time and place, and he explains how the advent of recording technology in the twentieth century forever changed our relationship to playing, performing, and listening to music.

Acting as historian and anthropologist, raconteur and social scientist, he searches for patterns—and shows how those patterns have affected his own work over the years with Talking Heads and his many collaborators, from Brian Eno to Caetano Veloso. Byrne sees music as part of a larger, almost Darwinian pattern of adaptations and responses to its cultural and physical context. His range is panoptic, taking us from Wagnerian opera houses to African villages, from his earliest high school reel-to-reel recordings to his latest work in a home music studio (and all the big studios in between).

Touching on the joy, the physics, and even the business of making music, How Music Works is a brainy, irresistible adventure and an impassioned argument about music’s liberating, life-affirming power.

VERDICT: KEEP 


TOTAL: OUT OF 11 
KEEP: 9
DELETE: 2

Thanks for reading and leave a comment down below!!! 

Sav 

Decluttering My Goodreads TBR #3

You can the first posts here (Part 1) and here, (Part 2) !!

If you want to join along and declutter your own Goodreads TBR follow along with these instructions!

Also I’ve made myself a rule that if I have deleted the first in a series, then the rest of the series goes along with it. Just to make things easier on me whenever I get further into this.

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

1) The Wrath and the Dawn (The Wrath and the Dawn #1) by Renee Ahdieh

One Life to One Dawn.

In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

Night after night, Shahrzad beguiles Khalid, weaving stories that enchant, ensuring her survival, though she knows each dawn could be her last. But something she never expected begins to happen: Khalid is nothing like what she’d imagined him to be. This monster is a boy with a tormented heart. Incredibly, Shahrzad finds herself falling in love. How is this possible? It’s an unforgivable betrayal. Still, Shahrzad has come to understand all is not as it seems in this palace of marble and stone. She resolves to uncover whatever secrets lurk and, despite her love, be ready to take Khalid’s life as retribution for the many lives he’s stolen. Can their love survive this world of stories and secrets?

Sounds pretty interesting. I’ve heard a few mixed reactions to this but I think I’ll take my  chances and check it out at some point.

VERDICT: KEEP 

2) A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1) by Sarah J. Maas

Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever. 

Weird nitpicky thing I’m going to point because I just have to ask: what’s with so many YA fantasy series just naming their series after the first book??? I just looked at The Wrath and the Dawn and Sarah J Maas’s other series is just named after the first book in the series,  Throne of Glass. Could it bother you to be just a smidge more imaginative? Also I have A LOT of negative feelings towards the TOG series itself and I know enough about this series and this particular book to know that I doubt I would ever pick this up for any sort of enjoyment.

VERDICT: A BIG DELETE 

3) Sabriel (Abhorsen #1) by Garth Nix

Sent to a boarding school in Ancelstierre as a young child, Sabriel has had little experience with the random power of Free Magic or the Dead who refuse to stay dead in the Old Kingdom. But during her final semester, her father, the Abhorsen, goes missing, and Sabriel knows she must enter the Old Kingdom to find him. 

With Sabriel, the first installment in the Abhorsen series, Garth Nix exploded onto the fantasy scene as a rising star, in a novel that takes readers to a world where the line between the living and the dead isn’t always clear—and sometimes disappears altogether.

I know this is a very influential and well-known fantasy series that should definitely read at some point. However like the Magic 8-Ball would say “ask again later”.

VERDICT: GO 

4) Pretties (Uglies #2) by Scott Westerfeld

Gorgeous. Popular. Perfect.

Perfectly wrong.

Tally has finally become pretty. Now her looks are beyond perfect, her clothes are awesome, her boyfriend is totally hot, and she’s completely popular. It’s everything she’s ever wanted.

But beneath all the fun — the nonstop parties, the high-tech luxury, the total freedom — is a nagging sense that something’s wrong. Something important. Then a message from Tally’s ugly past arrives. Reading it, Tally remembers what’s wrong with pretty life, and the fun stops cold.

Now she has to choose between fighting to forget what she knows and fighting for her life — because the authorities don’t intend to let anyone with this information survive. 

It’s kind of bizarre that I added the second book in a series I haven’t even read :////. Although my interest in Uglies series used to be very high, now I’m not so interested.

VERDICT: GO 

5) Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

In this graphic memoir, Alison Bechdel charts her fraught relationship with her late father.

Distant and exacting, Bruce Bechdel was an English teacher and director of the town funeral home, which Alison and her family referred to as the Fun Home. It was not until college that Alison, who had recently come out as a lesbian, discovered that her father was also gay. A few weeks after this revelation, he was dead, leaving a legacy of mystery for his daughter to resolve.

A book by the woman who created The Bechdel Test? I’m sold.

VERDICT: KEEP 

6) Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine By Kelley Sue DeConnick

Eisner Award-nominated writer Kelly Sue DeConnick (Pretty Deadly, Captain Marvel) and Valentine De Landro (X-Factor) team up to bring you the premiere volume of Bitch Planet, a deliciously vicious riff on women-in-prison sci-fi exploitation.

In a future just a few years down the road in the wrong direction, a woman’s failure to comply with her patriarchal overlords will result in exile to the meanest penal planet in the galaxy. When the newest crop of fresh femmes arrive, can they work together to stay alive or will hidden agendas, crooked guards, and the deadliest sport on (or off!) Earth take them to their maker?

Collects BITCH PLANET #1-5.

I already have this in single issues. But I’m going to keep it on in case I do decide to get the volumes instead.

VERDICT: KEEP 

7) Habibi by Craig Thompson

From the internationally acclaimed author of Blankets (“A triumph for the genre.”Library Journal), a highly anticipated new graphic novel.
 
Sprawling across an epic landscape of deserts, harems, and modern industrial clutter, Habibi tells the tale of Dodola and Zam, refugee child slaves bound to each other by chance, by circumstance, and by the love that grows between them. We follow them as their lives unfold together and apart; as they struggle to make a place for themselves in a world (not unlike our own) fueled by fear, lust, and greed; and as they discover the extraordinary depth—and frailty—of their connection.
 
At once contemporary and timeless, Habibi gives us a love story of astounding resonance: a parable about our relationship to the natural world, the cultural divide between the first and third worlds, the common heritage of Christianity and Islam, and, most potently, the magic of storytelling.

This is very high ratings (of course though I don’t really base my interest all on Goodreads ratings). Although I’m very wary that this isn’t an #OWNVoices book since its about Middle Eastern characters and culture. Ultimately I’m probably taking this off my TBR for now.

VERDICT: GO 

8) Giant Days, Vol. 1 (Giant Days #1) by John Allison

Susan, Esther, and Daisy started at university three weeks ago and became fast friends. Now, away from home for the first time, all three want to reinvent themselves. But in the face of handwringing boys, “personal experimentation,” influenza, mystery-mold, nu-chauvinism, and the willful, unwanted intrusion of “academia,” they may be lucky just to make it to spring alive. Going off to university is always a time of change and growth, but for Esther, Susan, and Daisy, things are about to get a little weird.

Collects issues #1-4

I’ve realized from these Decluttering Posts that I’ve had a sudden disinterest in a lot of comics and graphic novels. Don’t get me wrong there’s still plenty out there I love and a lot that I still want to get to, but it’s still this pattern I’m noticing that I’m losing interest in certain titles.

VERDICT: GO 

9) Outcast, Vol. 1: A Darkness Surrounds Him by Robert Kirkman

NEW HORROR SERIES FROM THE WALKING DEAD CREATOR ROBERT KIRKMAN! 

Kyle Barnes has been plagued by demonic possession all his life and now he needs answers. Unfortunately, what he uncovers along the way could bring about the end of life on Earth as we know it. 

Collects OUTCAST BY KIRKMAN & AZACETA #1-6.

I mean it sounds interesting enough but not entirely sure I’m going to keep on my TBR.

VERDICT: GO 

10) Stitches by David Small

One day David Small awoke from a supposedly harmless operation to discover that he had been transformed into a virtual mute. A vocal cord removed, his throat slashed and stitched together like a bloody boot, the fourteen-year-old boy had not been told that he had cancer and was expected to die.

In Stitches, Small, the award-winning children’s illustrator and author, re-creates this terrifying event in a life story that might have been imagined by Kafka. As the images painfully tumble out, one by one, we gain a ringside seat at a gothic family drama where David—a highly anxious yet supremely talented child—all too often became the unwitting object of his parents’ buried frustration and rage.

Believing that they were trying to do their best, David’s parents did just the reverse. Edward Small, a Detroit physician, who vented his own anger by hitting a punching bag, was convinced that he could cure his young son’s respiratory problems with heavy doses of radiation, possibly causing David’s cancer. Elizabeth, David’s mother, tyrannically stingy and excessively scolding, ran the Small household under a cone of silence where emotions, especially her own, were hidden.

Depicting this coming-of-age story with dazzling, kaleidoscopic images that turn nightmare into fairy tale, Small tells us of his journey from sickly child to cancer patient, to the troubled teen whose risky decision to run away from home at sixteen—with nothing more than the dream of becoming an artist—will resonate as the ultimate survival statemen.

Well this sounds wild af. Will I read it at some point? Possibly??? Are there other things I’d rather read before this? Yes.

VERDICT: GO 


TOTAL: Out of 10 
KEEP: 2 
DELETE: 8

Thanks for reading and leave a comment down below!!! 

Sav 

 

Decluttering My Goodreads TBR Part 2

Part 2 out of this continuing saga of me trying to declutter my massive TBR list on Goodreads.

Read My First Decluttering TBR Post Here

How this works is:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I have decided that I’ll be looking through 10 books since I have a ways to go.

As you’ll see in this one I have a bunch of graphic novels and comics, as I was going through a huge phase of wanting to read more of those things.


1) Jane, the Fox, and Me by Fanny Britt

Hélène has been inexplicably ostracized by the girls who were once her friends. Her school life is full of whispers and lies — Hélène weighs 216; she smells like BO. Her loving mother is too tired to be any help. Fortunately, Hélène has one consolation, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. Hélène identifies strongly with Jane’s tribulations, and when she is lost in the pages of this wonderful book, she is able to ignore her tormentors. But when Hélène is humiliated on a class trip in front of her entire grade, she needs more than a fictional character to allow her to see herself as a person deserving of laughter and friendship.
Leaving the outcasts’ tent one night, Hélène encounters a fox, a beautiful creature with whom she shares a moment of connection. But when Suzanne Lipsky frightens the fox away, insisting that it must be rabid, Hélène’s despair becomes even more pronounced: now she believes that only a diseased and dangerous creature would ever voluntarily approach her. But then a new girl joins the outcasts’ circle, Géraldine, who does not even appear to notice that she is in danger of becoming an outcast herself. And before long Hélène realizes that the less time she spends worrying about what the other girls say is wrong with her, the more able she is to believe that there is nothing wrong at all.
This emotionally honest and visually stunning graphic novel reveals the casual brutality of which children are capable, but also assures readers that redemption can be found through connecting with another, whether the other is a friend, a fictional character or even, amazingly, a fox.

This sounds just up my alley!! A dark and emotional story with a fairy tale-ish spin.

VERDICT: Keep 

2) Lumberjanes, Vol 2: Friendship to the Max by Noelle Stevenson

Jo, April, Mal, Molly, and Ripley are not your average campers and Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady-Types is not your average summer camp. Between the river monsters, magic, and the art of friendship bracelets, this summer is only just beginning. Join the Lumberjanes as they take on raptors and a sibling rivalry that only myths are made of.

This New York Times bestseller and Eisner Award-nominated series is written by awesome all-star Noelle Stevenson and brilliant newcomer Grace Ellis, and illustrated by the tremendously talented Brooke Allen.

As I said here in my first Decluttering post, I wasn’t interested in reading this series at the moment.

VERDICT: DELETE 

3) This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki

Every summer, Rose goes with her mom and dad to a lake house in Awago Beach. It’s their getaway, their refuge. Rosie’s friend Windy is always there, too, like the little sister she never had. But this summer is different. Rose’s mom and dad won’t stop fighting, and when Rose and Windy seek a distraction from the drama, they find themselves with a whole new set of problems. It’s a summer of secrets and sorrow and growing up, and it’s a good thing Rose and Windy have each other.

In This One Summer two stellar creators redefine the teen graphic novel. Cousins Mariko and Jillian Tamaki, the team behind Skim, have collaborated on this gorgeous, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful story about a girl on the cusp of her teen age — a story of renewal and revelation.

Every time I see this in the book store I always want to grab it but I never seem to. The cover on the art has always appealed to me and reading the synopsis makes it clear that  I do want to get to this at some point.

VERDICT: KEEP 

4) Sex Criminals #1: Suzie Down in the Quiet by Matt Fraction

A SEX COMEDY FOR COMICS
Suzie’s a normal girl with an extraordinary ability: when she has sex, she stops time. One night she meets John… who has the same gift. And so they do what any other sex-having, time-stopping, couple would do: they rob banks. In the vein of THE 40-YEAR OLD VIRGIN and BRIDESMAIDS, Image Comics invites you to come along with MATT FRACTION (Hawkeye, SATELLITE SAM) and CHIP ZDARSKY (Prison Funnies, Monster Cops) for the series that puts the “comic” back in “comics” and the “sexy” back in “sex crimes.”

I’m actually interested in this particular series but  I’m going to delete since this is the single issue and I’d prefer to read it in volumes instead.

VERDICT: DELETE

5) Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

Nemeses! Dragons! Science! Symbolism! All these and more await in this brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson. Featuring an exclusive epilogue not seen in the web comic, along with bonus conceptual sketches and revised pages throughout, this gorgeous full-color graphic novel is perfect for the legions of fans of the web comic and is sure to win Noelle many new ones.

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren’t the heroes everyone thinks they are.

But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona’s powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

I’m probably going to keep this just because its not like Lumberjanes where its a bunch of different volumes to collect and it would be a good way to sample Noelle Stevenson’s work.

VERDICT: KEEP 

6) Pride and Joy (Runaways #1) – Brian K. Vaughan

Meet Alex, Karolina, Gert, Chase, Molly and Nico – a group of teens whose lives are about to take an unexpected turn…

A very short synopsis but I basically know some of the story behind the Runaways series and I have to say that I’m not as interested in this series as I once was. I may revisit this at some point but for now, I’m moving on from it.

VERDICT: DELETE 

7) American Vampire Vol. 1 – Scott Snyder & Stephen King

From writers Scott Snyder and Stephen King, American Vampire introduces a new strain of vampire – a more vicious species – and traces the creatures’ bloodline through decades of American history.
Snyder’s tale follows Pearl, a young woman living in 1920s Los Angeles, who is brutally turned into a vampire and sets out on a path of righteous revenge against the European monsters who tortured and abused her. And in King’s story set in the days of America’s Wild West, readers learn the origin of Skinner Sweet, the original American vampire – a stronger, faster creature than any vampire ever seen before.
Don’t miss out as Snyder and King set fire to the horror genre with this visionary, all-original take on one of the most popular monster stories!
This beautiful collection features a new introduction by Stephen King and bonus art including character sketches, variant covers and more!

Collecting: American Vampire 1-5 

That name-drop of Stephen King really sparked my interest in this, however I think I’m going to let this one go because I don’t own it yet and there’s several other things I’d rather get to before this one, and also because I haven’t seen it in any book store.

VERDICT: GO 

8) Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Anya could really use a friend. But her new BFF isn’t kidding about the “Forever” part.
Of all the things Anya expected to find at the bottom of an old well, a new friend was not one of them. Especially not a new friend who’s been dead for a century.
Falling down a well is bad enough, but Anya’s normal life might actually be worse. She’s embarrassed by her family, self-conscious about her body, and she’s pretty much given up on fitting in at school. A new friend—even a ghost—is just what she needs.
Or so she thinks. Spooky, sardonic, and secretly sincere, Anya’s Ghost is a wonderfully entertaining debut from author/artist Vera Brosgol.

This synposis sounds interesting to me and it’s only one book. So I’ll have to save up some money for this one and read it for Halloween season!!

VERDICT: KEEP 

9) The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater

“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

From Maggie Stiefvater, the bestselling and acclaimed author of the Shiver trilogy and The Scorpio Races, comes a spellbinding new series where the inevitability of death and the nature of love lead us to a place we’ve never been before 

So this is actually my first time ever reading this synopsis and I have to say that I’m more interested in reading this than I ever have been. I know from Booktube and other book blogs that this is a fairly popular YA series. I’ve heard many claim The Raven Cycle a favorite series of theirs, so the hype for this is pretty huge. That being said, I have heard some criticisms of the series that make me really ponder whether I would even enjoy it. I think I will try to read the first book at least and see whether I would continue or not.

VERDICT: KEEP 

10) A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire #1) by George RR Martin

Long ago, in a time forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons out of balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens.

Here an enigmatic band of warriors bear swords of no human metal; a tribe of fierce wildlings carry men off into madness; a cruel young dragon prince barters his sister to win back his throne; and a determined woman undertakes the most treacherous of journeys. Amid plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies hangs perilously in the balance, as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.

I own this book and the other books in the series and I will definitely be getting around to this at some point since I do really enjoy the show (for the most part anyways). ITS F***ING GAME OF THRONES.

VERDICT: KEEP 


TOTAL: Out of 10

Keep: 6
Delete: 4

Decluttering My Goodreads TBR List #1

So this idea I came across from Ally @ AllyWritesThings  who found this idea from Lia @ Lost in a Story

The gist of it is:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

This is something I really need since I have the problem of immediately adding something on Goodreads just because the cover looks good or I maybe liked the sound of the description at the time but now it sounds mediocre.

My TBR is also massively huge… I mean look at this. I have a serious problem y’all.

my tbr pic


 

1) Twist and Shout by Gabriel

Destiel Fanfic
What begins as a transforming love between Dean Winchester and Castiel Novak in the summer of 1965 quickly derails into something far more tumultuous when Dean is drafted in the Vietnam War. Though the two both voice their relationship is one where saying goodbye is never a real truth, their story becomes fraught with the tragedy of circumstance. In an era where homosexuality was especially vulnerable, Twist and Shout is the story of the love transcending time, returning over and over in its many forms, as faithful as the sea.

THIS IS LITERALLY FAN FICTION!!! OF A SHIP FROM A SHOW THAT I NO LONGER WATCH. instant delete.

Verdict: bye-bye

2) The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath’s shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity. 

Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther’s breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic

This is one I’m definitely going to keep because it’s a classic and honestly I feel like it’s about an issue that I can sort of relate to (sad but true).

Verdict: Keep

3) Rat Queens Vol. 1 Sass & Sorcery by Kurtis J. Wiebe, art by Roc Upchurch

Who are the Rat Queens? 

They’re a pack of booze-guzzling, death-dealing battle maidens-for-hire and they’re in the business of killing all the god’s creatures for profit. Meet Hannah the Rockabilly Elven Mage, Violet the Hipster Dwarven Fighter, Dee the Atheist Human Cleric and Betty the Hippy Smidgen Thief. 

This modern spin on an old school genre is a violent, monster-killing epic that is like Buffy meets Tank Girl in a Lord of the Rings world on crack! 

Collecting Rat Queens #1-5!

“Buffy meets Tank Girl in a Lord of the Rings world on crack”. This description sounds 100% up my alley. With the Dungeons & Dragons craze that’s been happening lately with the McElroy Brothers / The Adventure Zone and others getting in on it, this sounds like it would be a really fun read. Also I love the art looks really good.

Verdict: Keep

4) Ms. Marvel Vol. 1: No Normal by G. Willow Wilson, art by Adrian Alphona

Marvel Comics presents the new Ms. Marvel, the groundbreaking heroine that has become an international sensation!

Kamala Khan is an ordinary girl from Jersey City — until she’s suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. But who truly is the new Ms. Marvel? Teenager? Muslim? Inhuman? Find out as she takes the Marvel Universe by storm! When Kamala discovers the dangers of her newfound powers, she unlocks a secret behind them, as well. Is Kamala ready to wield these immense new gifts? Or will the weight of the legacy before her be too much to bear? Kamala has no idea, either. But she’s comin’ for you, Jersey! 

It’s history in the making from acclaimed writer G. Willow Wilson (Air, Cairo) and beloved artist Adrian Alphona (RUNAWAYS)! Collecting MS. MARVEL (2014) #1-5 and material from ALL-NEW MARVEL NOW! POINT ONE #1.

This one is much more difficult for me to decide. On one hand: I know it has incredible art and that a lot of people really like it. And it has great Muslim representation from its main character, Kamala Khan. On the other hand, I’ve really kind of removed from my Marvel comics craze that I used to be in a for a few years and I’m just not interested in reading any more superhero comics from Marvel or DC. I don’t hate those things but I’m just not as obsessed with it as I was years ago.

Verdict: Keep?? 

5) Lumberjanes, Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy by Noelle Stevenson

FRIENDSHIP TO THE MAX!

At Miss Qiunzilla Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s camp for hard-core lady-types, things are not what they seem. Three-eyed foxes. Secret caves. Anagrams. Luckily, Jo, April, Mal, Molly, and Ripley are five rad, butt-kicking best pals determined to have an awesome summer together… And they’re not gonna let a magical quest or an array of supernatural critters get in their way! The mystery keeps getting bigger, and it all begins here. 

Collects Lumberjanes No. 1-4.

The art style looks cute and it sounds CUTE, but it just looks like it’s not really my thing. I might pick it up sometime in the future possibly but there’s sooo many other comics I’d rather get to reading first way before this series.

Verdict: Adios!! 

6) The Wicked + The Divine #1 by Kieron Gillen, art by Jamie McKelvie

Every 90 years or so, twelve gods incarnate in the bodies of the young. They are charismatic and brilliant. They stand before crowds, speak in tongues, and send them into rapture. They’re rumored to perform secretive miracles. They save people’s lives, either metaphorically or literally.
They are loved. They are hated. They are brilliant.
Within two years, they’re dead.

So I’ve read this already this since it was with the first volume of the series, so I don’t really need to keep this single issue on here.

Verdict: Delete


TOTAL: Out of 6
Keep: 3 
Delete: 3

So I’ll definitely be doing more of this because I have a long ways to go with 4288 books to sort through and it feels therapeutic.

Thanks for reading and leave a comment down below!!! 

Sav